Talks and Panel Discussion
24 Sep 2020 – 25 Sep 2020

teststrecke.berlin – Science Communication in the Humanities

Venue: Online

Social cohesion is also based on successful public communication. The Corona crisis has impressively demonstrated that science communication plays a role in this. What specific role do the humanities play?

teststrecke.berlin's goal is to support scientists and scholars in interacting with a broad public in a targeted manner. There is no single formula for success that can be applied to all conceivable projects, nor is there a single secret recipe. Rather, the key lies in finding suitable formats, refining them and tailoring them to one's own content and methods. We want to start by looking at which formats are already successfully used in the humanities, which strategic goals are associated with them and how these can be better achieved through targeted ‘tuning’. We are going on the test track!

teststrecke.berlin is a cooperation between Nina Diezemann (Stabsstelle FU-BUA/Abteilung Forschung, Freie Universität Berlin), Florenz Gilly (DFG Graduiertenkolleg 2190 “Literatur- und Wissensgeschichte kleiner Formen”, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin), Kristiane Hasselmann (SFB 980 “Episteme in Bewegung. Wissenstransfer von der alten Welt bis in die Frühe Neuzeit”, Freie Universität Berlin), Armin Hempel (SFB 980 “Episteme in Bewegung. Wissenstransfer von der alten Welt bis in die Frühe Neuzeit”, Freie Universität Berlin), Maren Jäger (DFG Graduiertenkolleg 2190 “Literatur- und Wissensgeschichte kleiner Formen”, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin), Uta Kornmeier (Akademie, Humboldt Forum), Irmela Marei Krüger-Fürhoff (Institut für Deutsche und Niederländische Philologie/Friedrich Schlegel Graduiertenschule für literaturwissenschaftliche Studien, Freie Universität Berlin), Rebecca Mak (Friedrich Schlegel Graduiertenschule für literaturwissenschaftliche Studien, Freie Universität Berlin), Katharina Metz (SFB 1171 “Affective Societies – Dynamiken des Zusammenlebens in bewegten Welten”, Freie Universität Berlin), Dirk Naguschewski (Leibniz-Zentrum für Literatur- und Kulturforschung), Petra Wodtke (Exzellenzcluster “Temporal Communities – Doing Literature in a Global Perspective”, Freie Universität Berlin).

Program

Thursday, 24 Sep 2020, 13.30

Pit stop 1: Exchange

Within the exchange we present and discuss different formats of science communication in the humanities and cultural sciences. Science communicators and those who want to become science communicators exchange information about current projects, discuss opportunities, obstacles and the basics for successful project-specific science communication, and have the opportunity to network. The focus is on the exchange of information about concrete ongoing science projects and plans in the Berlin area.

Click here to register for the exchange.

 

Friday, 25 Sep 2020, 10.00–13.00, closed event

Pit stop 2: Round Table

The communication of research findings in the humanities is subject to different requirements than the communication of newly gained scientific or technical findings. However, there is not yet any real understanding of the specifics of this form of science communication. The Round Table offers stake holders from science, journalism and politics the opportunity to discuss the conditions and strategic objectives of science communication in the humanities.



Friday, 25 Sep 2020, 16.00–17.30, livestream from the Museum für Kommunikation

Pit stop 3: Panel discussion

In the panel discussion, which will be streamed from the Museum für Kommunikation, we will bring together three outstanding personalities from the fields of history, cultural studies, and literary studies who use various innovative communication formats to communicate their findings and/or reach a broad audience in the traditional way.

We ask to what extent the humanities bear a social responsibility and what role the communication of results in the humanities plays in social cohesion. Together we will discuss appreciation, moments of happiness and frustration in science communication, resistance and open doors. We are interested in how the panelists have found suitable formats and media for their research. Which networks and resources did they have access to? And how do formats of science communication and interaction with a broad public affect research in the humanities?

Participants:

Jens Rehländer (VolkswagenStiftung, Hannover, Head of Communication)
Barbara Stollberg-Rilinger (President of the Wissenschaftskolleg zu Berlin, Chair of Early Modern History at the Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster)
Joseph Vogl (Speaker of the DFG Graduiertenkolleg 2190 “Literatur- und Wissensgeschichte kleiner Formen”, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Chair of Literature and Cultural Studies/Media at the Humboldt University of Berlin)

Moderation: Kristiane Hasselmann (SFB 980 "Episteme in Bewegung") and Anja Schaluschke (Museum für Kommunikation Berlin)

Current information on the panel discussion can be found on the teststrecke.berlin website.

 

Fig. above: CeDiS, Freie Universität Berlin